Reasons I am Pro-Life: An Op-Ed About Abortion

Reasons I am Pro-Life: An Op-Ed About Abortion

Trigger Warning: Contains sensitive content about sexual assault and abortion!

On the 46th anniversary of the 1973 Roe v. Wade Court Ruling on January 22, New York signed a bill making it legal for a woman to get an abortion after 24 weeks of pregnancy if her health is threatened or if the fetus would be unable to survive outside the womb. Previously, abortion had only been permitted during the first 24 weeks of pregnancy. Also, many expect Roe v. Wade to be overturned under President Donald Trump’s leadership, but New York and other left-leaning states hope to protect abortion rights even if it is overturned.

On February 21, Vermont House also passed a bill stating, “Every individual who becomes pregnant has the fundamental right to choose to carry a pregnancy to term, give birth to a child, or to have an abortion.” This bill passed by a vote of 106-36, according to Alexandra Desanctis from National Review. Citizens consider this act to be more radical than the legalization of late-term abortions in New York because it permits abortion for any reason—not only for health reasons.

The Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act also failed to pass on February 25, with a vote of 53-44. This legislation stated, “If an abortion results in the live birth of an infant, the infant is a legal person for all purposes under the laws of the United States, and entitled to all the protections of such laws.” However, this bill was seven votes short of approval.

Recently, I have seen posts on social media platforms about New York State legalizing abortion throughout every stage of pregnancy. Abortion has always been a controversial subject, associated with a plethora of negative emotions from both sides of the argument and resulting in hurt feelings and misunderstandings. Both sides are knee deep in resentment and bitterness towards each other. I write this in hopes that some will see the merit of the other side of the argument. I want to approach this with logic as well as tell my story, and I hope that I do not hurt others in the process; however, I recognize my potential bias.

The trademark “right to choose” is a slogan that is easy to get behind, as it promotes women’s rights, which I support—I believe that we all have a right to our own body. However, I do not understand how that universally broad argument is used to address the responsibility of life. Obviously, abortion is not comparable to choosing whether you want milk or OJ for breakfast, as it is infinitely more serious than that. Hence the underlying and fundamental question: “what is the unborn?” Unfortunately, there is no universal answer that society accepts due to differing beliefs. I will not discount those beliefs, as it would induce negative emotions nullifying the point of this article; however, I refuse to conform to the “what if’” arguments. These arguments do nothing but emotionally charge a situation which, in turn, moves the focus away from the fundamental problem at hand: when does the humanity of a fetus become a reality? My conclusion is: no matter how extreme the circumstance, it is never morally acceptable to pre-emptively terminate the future of a child. Fundamentally, this is because of my belief that even the embryo, the “sack of cells,” has an identity as a result of its natural development into a baby.

Before someone brings up the fact that as a Christian, I have a predisposition to choose the Pro-Life argument, I want to point out that many Christians are Pro-Choice as well. Secondly, I have often heard that religion should not influence the laws of society. My response to that is: laws in relation to stealing, murder, and bearing false witness against another are all found in the Ten Commandments as well. Just because the Church agrees with a law does not make it any less a law.

I recognize that my Pro-Life stance may be seen as abrasive, hurtful, and lacking in empathy towards women who have to go through unwanted pregnancy, but this could not be farther from the truth. Do I know what they go through? Of course not. Furthermore, I know that as a male, I will never fully understand all of the potential hurt and pain a woman could face due to an unintended pregnancy. Yet, I believe that a baby is one of the greatest gifts from God and needs to be seen as such. Christians love to throw around phrases like “for in the darkness, there is light” and “where there is evil, there is good,” but I truly believe that God has a plan and a name for every baby, regardless of how they were conceived. This belief stems from my story—a story that is unique but also similar to many others.

Many of you do not know my story, not because I am ashamed of it, but because I was afraid that I would be judged for something that was out of my control—out of my birth mother's control.

My birth mother and her friend were both raped by a man they not only knew, but were comfortable with; they were taken advantage of when they felt safe. What did they get in return? A memory that should never have been reality and a memory they wish they could forget. My birth mother was 16 when she found out that she was pregnant with me. I was not planned, but I was wanted, and I was loved before I was even born. I am here today because my birth mother did not see me as a “blob of tissue,” but as a living and developing baby. I am here today because of my birth mother's choice to give birth and put me up for adoption.

“Giving you up was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do in my life, but I know it was the right thing to do—to give you the best life possible.” I can vividly remember my birth mother saying this to me with tears streaming down her face when we were talking one day. I cannot begin to imagine how painful it was for her to not only decide to go through with the pregnancy, but to give me up for adoption. I cannot fathom the trials that come with going through with an unwanted pregnancy, and I will not pretend that I do. However, I know I would not be here without my birth mother's choice, and I am grateful. I am blessed to have a healthy and thriving relationship with her, a luxury most adopted children do not have. Not only that, I am now a big brother to two beautiful half-siblings whom I adore.

I hope my views have allowed you to see this issue from a different angle. If you take this story to heart in a negative way, I am sorry, but I will not apologize for standing for what I believe.

Ring(s) by Spring?

Ring(s) by Spring?

#abolishTWUSA

#abolishTWUSA