Django Unchained

Django Unchained

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djangoAs I sat through the previews at the Rio Theatre on Commercial Drive, stuffing my face with a Red Burrito masterpiece, I found myself somewhat dreading the thought of having to sit through this film. I mean yes I think Christoph Waltz is brilliant and of course Leonardo DiCaprio still makes me weak at the knees, but a film about the adventures of a freed slave and a German bounty hunter didn’t exactly thrill me. But, as soon as the opening credits burst onto the screen, accompanied by Luis Enrique Bacalov performing a song rightly en­titled “Django”, it became clear that I was about to be sorely mistaken. This film absolutely blew my mind. From the detail of the sound editing to the ridiculousness of the “bag head” scene, in which Jonah Hill makes a cameo appearance, to using Rick Ross and John Legend in the soundtrack; everything is done to mere perfection. Set in the antebellum era of the Deep South, it is the perfect combination of a spaghetti western and the oh-so-exuberant and off kilter style that is quintessentially Taranti­no, thus creating a recipe for delicious success.

Christoph Waltz is superb in this film, topping his performance from Inglorious Basterds with skillful wit. His intoxicating way of speaking makes me think if he started a cult I would have a hard time not following him. Jamie Foxx as the lead character of Django took “badass” to a whole new level. Riding around killing white people for money suited him quite well. Although not usually his big­gest fan, I will concede that Samuel L. Jackson, the infamous muse to direc­tor Tarantino, wowed me in his evil and menacing role of Stephen. Leon­ardo DiCaprio portrays the calculat­ing and manipulative Calvin Candie, one of the most influential slavers in the south who lives on a plantation referred to as “Candie Land” [insert physical cringe here]. His perfor­mance was seamless and even when he gets accidentally injured during a scene, blood gushing from his hand, he never falters.

It’s not often that a film can bring to light issues of extreme inequality and racism, which are overwhelming and unbearable at times, whilst pro­viding a dialogue that is comically un­paralleled. I think the Wall Street Jour­nal said it best when they described the film as “wildly extravagant, fero­ciously violent, ludicrously lurid and outrageously entertaining.” Just go see it already not only for yourselves, but also so I have more people to talk about it with. Enjoy!

Out of the Shire, into the Uncanny Valley

Out of the Shire, into the Uncanny Valley

Smart Fiction

Smart Fiction