NEWS BITES

NEWS BITES

NEWS-BITES-FEAT.png

Attawapiskat Chief vows to continue hunger strike It has been over a month since Attawapiskat Chief The­resa Spence began her liquids-only hunger strike to raise awareness for the Idle No More movement. The move­ment started when many Canadian First Nations people opposed Bill C-45, a bill designed to make leasing of land reserves easier. Spence and 100 other chiefs met with Prime Minister Stephen Harper on January 11th, discussing concerns of the bill. Future talks are planned with leaders from both sides, but Spence promises to continue her strike until the issue has been fully resolved.

NHL Lockout ends

Lasting 113 days, the 2012-2013 NHL Lockout was a la­bor dispute that started on September 15th and ended on January 6th. The owners of the league’s franchises and the players finally agreed on a Collective Bargain­ing Agreement after 16 hours of intense negotiation. The new contract includes a limit of eight years on contract extensions, a limit of seven years on new contracts, a sal­ary floor of $44 million, and a salary cap of $60 million.

Government loses data on 583,000 Canadians

A portable hard drive containing personal information about people who received student loans has gone miss­ing. The device was lost in early November, yet the Ca­nadian government announced on January 11th that stu­dents who were part of the federal loan program from 2000-2006. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Minister Diane Finley says there is no evidence of fraud and that letters will be sent to all those affected.

Haiti president criticizes aid on earthquake anniversary

Over two million people lost their homes in the devastat­ing earthquake that hit Haiti three years ago, yet Haitian President Michel Martelly says that only one third of the aid that was pledged has been given. Since the earth­quake, Haiti has been affected by a cholera epidemic, landslides, hurricanes, and rampant crime. Martelly calls for every country that is involved to reassess the re­covery plan.

USA-Afghan combat reduced

American President Barack Obama has announced that U.S. troops will adopt a “fundamentally different” mis­sion in Afghanistan. Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Barack Obama have agreed to end most of the American combat operations this spring. The American troops will switch to training, advising, and assisting Afghan forces, with an objective of pulling nearly all 66,000 troops out by 2014.

Orcas freed from Hudson Bay

The village of Inukjuak in Northern Quebec has cau­tiously expressed its joy after 12 orca whales appeared to have freed themselves from ice in Hudson Bay. How­ever, wildlife experts say the orcas aren’t out of danger yet, as the ice might trap the mammals in another part of the bay. Climate change is most likely the cause behind large predators staying longer in Hudson Bay than they should.

Lawyering up

Lawyering up

Life Pro Tips

Life Pro Tips