The wrong side of the law school

The wrong side of the law school

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TWU faces security breaches after receiving inaccurate accusations of anti-homosexual sentiments.

This month the Council of Canadian Law Deans distribut­ed a letter criti­cizing Trinity Western University’s community covenant for its perceived intolerance of homosexuality. “This is a matter of great concern for all members.... Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is unlaw­ful in Canada and fundamentally at odds with the core values of all Cana­dian law schools,” said Bill Flanagan, President of the council.

However, Flanagan failed to com­ment on the Supreme Court ruling in TWU’s favour in 2001, stating that a religious school can exempt itself from human rights legislation forbid­ding discrimination against homo­sexuals. The court maintained that TWU has the right to require staff, faculty, and students to abstain from homosexual relationships based on the principles of “freedom of con­science and religion.”

Over the past week, numerous media publications have interviewed students and staff for their opinions on the covenant, which have been near-unanimously positive—there are exceptionally few instances of dis­crimination or hateful stereotyping. When CTV asked President Jonathan Raymond directly, “What would you do if a student confessed to breaking the community covenant with regards to homosexual activity,” he replied, “I don’t know. Do you know why? Because it’s the beginning of a con­versation.” Raymond’s reply reflects the ideas of most people on campus, asserting the covenant as a source of inspiration for a higher standard of living and the continuous pursuit of truth as a collective body of Chris­tians.

But not all members of the public are as accepting of this philosophy. Two weeks ago, several TWU staff received upsetting emails related to the university’s recent spotlight in the media. Though worded harshly,  these emails did not contain any ac­tual threats. However, on Monday January 21, two laptops were stolen from Mattson Centre and a threaten­ing email was received by staff. Two days later, a faculty member received a phone call from a person claiming to be from Microsoft tech support at­tempting to gain access to his com­puter. The next day another laptop was reported stolen.

One of the laptops stolen may have contained students’ personal information including name, contact information, gender, date of birth, and previous school. The university failed to warn students of the poten­tial for identity theft until five days later, but asserted that the risk that someone could access this personal information is quite low.

Though there appears to be no immediate link between these recent acts of crime and the longstanding acts of the “Laptop Bandit,” predomi­nantly occurring in the Norma Mari­on Alloway Library, the entire campus is on a heightened level of security.

A credible source has confirmed the university received a threat in­tending to physically assault any at­tendees of the School of Business Speaker Series hosted in Vancouver on January 24. The university re­sponded by continuing with the event as planned but it also hired a private security firm to protect its students and guests. Fortunately, no alterca­tions occurred.

The university is now in close con­tact with the RCMP and the Office of Information and Privacy Commis­sioner of British Columbia.

Missions Week in Review

Missions Week in Review

留学生心得:克服文化差异

留学生心得:克服文化差异