Luke-warm

Luke-warm

lukewarm.jpg

The zombie genre gets a romantic twist.

I will be the first to claim an aversion to Zombie movies. I would watch the cheesiest Disney chick flick before I thought about wasting two hours watching corpses walk around, arms extended, feasting on human flesh. However, this movie was written and directed by Jonathan Levine (who also directed 50/50), so I decided to give it a try.

The film depicts a post-apocalyp­tic city with a growing population of “un-dead” characters who spend their days grunting and bumping into each other. The main zombie, R (Nicholas Hoult), does a relatable monologue voiceover that is really the only re­deemable part of the overly grisly be­ginning of the movie. After the open­ing scenes, the plot follows the slow (literally, corpse-like) romance of R and his human counterpart.

Teresa Palmer is a cute (albeit a Kristen Stewart look-alike) blonde, who adequately portrays the role of a human girl confused by her growing feelings for this male. But despite her being a Twilight doppelganger, this movie is not a Twilight knock-off.

Perhaps the most intriguing part of the movie was the gradual, delicate removal of R’s “zombie make up” to usher the plot believably toward the waking of the dead. He legitimately transformed from a creature with fleshy bits hanging from his mouth to a moderately attractive young man.

Another memorable compo­nent was the carefully constructed soundtrack that included classics by Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, and Guns N’ Roses as well as modern fa­vourites from Bon Iver, M83, and The National.

So, while I originally went to the movie so that I could creepily text my friends, “Warm bodies…? To­night…?”, it turned into an oddly en­joyable movie-going experience.

One-on-one with Two or Three

One-on-one with Two or Three

Posed or exposed?

Posed or exposed?